THE SILVER medal Anna Burnet won in the mixed Nacra 17 class at the Tokyo Olympic Games was greeted with delight at the Royal Northern and Clyde Yacht Club at Rhu, and by the whole Helensburgh and District community.

It was the climax to date of the 28 year-old Shandon girl’s remarkable career in sailing which began at the age of five in an Optimist dinghy in the Gareloch.

WHILE Helensburgh interest in the Tokyo Olympics was focussed on the sailing stars, gold medalist Eilidh McIntyre, silver medalist Anna Burnet, and finalists Charlotte Dobson and Luke Patience, in one burgh household what mattered most was the cycling.

In charge of the very successful GB cycling team was performance director Stephen Park, OBE, whose parents Douglas and Sylvia live in Crawford Drive.

THE DRAMATIC finish to the 2019 ICC World Championship propelled cricket into the media spotlight — followed by the Ashes, the no-holds barred Test match series between England and Australia.

There is a link between Helensburgh and Australian cricket, former Aussie skipper Stan Sismey, who found his bride-to-be in Helensburgh when serving with the Marine Aircraft Experimental Establishment during World War Two.

Bobby-Brown-16.12.09-wONE of the good guys of Scottish football in years gone by was a well-known Helensburgh man.

This was reaffirmed with the release in 2017 of a new account of the life of Rangers and Scotland goalkeeper and Scotland manager Bobby Brown.

AN AMERICAN golf club holds an annual club tournament called ‘The Battle of Glen Fruin’ — and now it plans to create its own monument to the 1603 battle.

John Vernasco, from Chicago, Illinois, contacted Helensburgh Heritage Trust to find out the dimensions of the Trust monument at the west end of the glen to those who died in clash between the Colquhouns and the MacGregors.

SCOTLAND is universally acknowledged as the home of golf, and bald statistics show that this is no myth.

In 2002 Scotland was ranked as world no.1 in terms of golf courses per unit of population, the next five being Ireland, U.S.A., Wales, Sweden and England.

JUST BEFORE the world waterspeed record was set on Loch Lomond on July 18 1932 by Kaye Don, there had been a trial run with a 13 year-old girl on board Miss England 111.

She went on to become Countess of Arran and, 48 years later, the fastest woman on water and the first to travel on water at over 100mph.

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