AN INFANTRY sergeant from Garelochead won two gallantry medals before he was killed in action on September 4 1917.

Born in Garelochhead on June 7 1896, Sergeant Norman Connor, of the 17th Battalion of the Highland Light Infantry (3rd Glasgow), had the unusual distinction of winning the Military Medal for bravery in the field twice in Flanders.

A COLOURFUL young man who died from wounds received on the Western Front at Ypres is named on the Garelochhead War Memorial.

Second Lieutenant Ronald George Brooman-White was born in the exclusive then Roxburghe Hotel in Edinburgh’s Charlotte Square on August 10 1892.

HAND-WRITTEN notes and sketches by Lieutenant Commander Leo Lane RNVR discovered in 2019 have confirmed RAF Helensburgh’s role in organising the Barnes Wallis Highball bouncing bomb trials on Loch Striven.

These trials took place in September and October 1944, but at the end of World War Two RAF Helensburgh went into mothballs.

BOTH Helensburgh Baptist Church and the Helensburgh Cenotaph in Hermitage Park agree that Staff Sergeant Pirret, a recipient of the Military Medal, died in France in 1917.

But strangely they disagree about his Christian name. In Baptist and other accounts he is named as Norman McLeod Pirret, but on the Park monument he is Edward Pirret.

THE GREAT grandson of the founder of Teachers Whisky, a young Army officer from Cove, was killed in action in the Flanders trenches on May 14 1916.

Second Lieutenant William George Teacher, who was 22, lost his life while in command of his company at Thiepval, a few weeks before the start of the Somme campaign.

A FIRST World War battleship which played an important role in the secret operations of RAF Helensburgh during World War Two was a key ship used in the D-Day landings 75 years ago during June 1944.

At the start of World War Two, Courbet, a former French battleship, was taken over by the British to stop the warship being taken over by the Germans and  used against the Allies.

THE CENTENARY in 2018 of the end of the First World War resulted in a lot of fascinating research on Helensburgh and district people who lost their lives in the conflict.

The stories of many — from the only woman named on the WW1 panel on the Hermitage Park Cenotaph to the chaplain who lost his life when a hospital ship was torpedoed – wcan be seen on this Helensburgh Heritage Trust website.

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